Journal Highlight: Oxidative stress and antioxidative systems: recipes for successful data collection and interpretation

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  • Published: May 9, 2016
  • Author: separationsNOW
  • Channels: Laboratory Informatics
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Oxidative stress and antioxidative systems: recipes for successful data collection and interpretation
A critical overview is given of currently popular methodologies for generating oxidative stress in plants, measuring ROS and major antioxidant metabolites, and assaying antioxidative enzymes and marker transcripts for oxidative stress.

Oxidative stress and antioxidative systems: recipes for successful data collection and interpretation

Plant, Cell & Environment, 2016, 39, 1140-1160
Graham Noctor, Amna Mhamdi and Christine H. Foyer

Abstract: Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common to many fundamental responses of plants. Enormous and ever-growing interest has focused on this research area, leading to an extensive literature that documents the tremendous progress made in recent years. As in other areas of plant biology, advances have been greatly facilitated by developments in genomics-dependent technologies and the application of interdisciplinary techniques that generate information at multiple levels. At the same time, advances in understanding ROS are fundamentally reliant on the use of biochemical and cell biology techniques that are specific to the study of oxidative stress. It is therefore timely to revisit these approaches with the aim of providing a guide to convenient methods and assisting interested researchers in avoiding potential pitfalls. Our critical overview of currently popular methodologies includes a detailed discussion of approaches used to generate oxidative stress, measurements of ROS themselves, determination of major antioxidant metabolites, assays of antioxidative enzymes and marker transcripts for oxidative stress. We consider the applicability of metabolomics, proteomics and transcriptomics approaches and discuss markers such as damage to DNA and RNA. Our discussion of current methodologies is firmly anchored to future technological developments within this popular research field.

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