Journal Highlight: Oxidative stress in asthmatic and non-asthmatic adolescent swimmers — A breathomics approach

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  • Published: Sep 18, 2017
  • Author: separationsNOW
  • Channels: Gas Chromatography
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Oxidative stress in asthmatic and non-asthmatic adolescent swimmers — A breathomics approach

The effect of a swimming training session on oxidative stress markers of asthmatic compared to non-asthmatic elite swimmers using exhaled breath metabolomics has been investigated by GC×GC-ToFMS.

Oxidative stress in asthmatic and non-asthmatic adolescent swimmers — A breathomics approach

Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 2017, 28, 452-457
Mariana Couto, Corália Barbosa, Diana Silva, Alisa Rudnitskaya, Luís Delgado, André Moreira and Sílvia M. Rocha

Abstract: We hypothesize that oxidative stress induced by trichloramine exposure during swimming could be related to etiopathogenesis of asthma among elite swimmers. The effect of a swimming training session on oxidative stress markers of asthmatic compared to non-asthmatic elite swimmers using exhaled breath (EB) metabolomics has been investigated. Elite swimmers annually screened in our department (n=27) were invited and those who agreed to participate (n=20, of which 9 with asthma) had EB collected (Tedlar® bags) before and after a swimming training session. SPME fiber (DVB/CAR/PDMS) was used to extract EB metabolites followed by a multidimensional gas chromatography analysis (GC×GC-ToFMS). Dataset comprises eight metabolites end products of lipid peroxidation: five aliphatic alkanes (nonane, 2,2,4,6,6-pentamethylheptane, decane, dodecane, and tetradecane) and three aldehydes (nonanal, decanal, and dodecanal). To assess exercise impact on lipid peroxidation markers, data were analyzed using principle component analysis (PCA), which was run on the original data set and on the data set constructed using differences in the metabolite total areas before and after exercise session. Heatmap representation revealed that metabolites content decreased after exercise, both for control and asthma groups; however, the greater decrease was observed for controls. Asthmatics and controls did not form separated clusters; however, control swimmers demonstrated a more varied response to the exercise being dispersed along all score plot. In well-trained athletes, swimming is associated with a decrease in oxidative stress markers independently of the presence of asthma, although a more pronounced decrease was seen in controls.

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