Journal Highlight: Effect of extraction, pasteurization and cold storage on flavonoids and other secondary metabolites in fresh orange juice

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  • Published: Sep 16, 2013
  • Author: separationsNOW
  • Channels: Sample Preparation
thumbnail image: Journal Highlight: Effect of extraction, pasteurization and cold storage on flavonoids and other secondary metabolites in fresh orange juice
The changes in nutrients, phytonutrients and other secondary metabolites due to different methods of orange juice extraction on the same batch of fruit have been investigated.

Effect of extraction, pasteurization and cold storage on flavonoids and other secondary metabolites in fresh orange juice

Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 2013, 93, 2771-2781
Jinhe Bai, John A Manthey, Bryan L Ford, Gary Luzio, Randall G Cameron, Jan Narciso, Elizabeth A Baldwin

Abstract: Fresh orange juice is perceived to be more wholesome than processed juice. Fresh juice may have nutrients and phytonutrients that differ from pasteurized or processed juice. "Hamlin" and "Valencia" oranges were extracted using a commercial food service juicer, pasteurized or not, resulting in fresh-commercial juice (FCJ) or pasteurized FCJ (FCPJ) for comparison with pasteurized processed juice (PPJ) in 2009, and gently hand-squeezed ‘Valencia’ juice (HSJ) in 2010 for nutrient and phytonutrient content. Regardless of pasteurization, FCJ/FCPJ contained 25–49% lower insoluble solids than the PPJ, while in HSJ the insoluble solids content was between that of FCJ and PPJ. The major orange juice flavonoid glycosides were twofold higher in PPJ than in FCJ/FCPJ and HSJ, indicating that the extraction and finishing process led to more peel tissue in the juice than fresh juice extraction methods. The total phenolic content (TPC) in the juices followed a similar pattern to the flavonoid glycoside content. The polymethoxylated flavones (PMFs), associated with peel oil, occurred at the highest levels in the FCJ/FCPJ and lowest in HSJ. Limonoids and alkaloids occurred at higher levels in PPJ and HSJ than in FCJ/FCPJ. The high peel oil content of FCJ/FCPJ resulted in higher PMF levels compared to PPJ and HSJ, while flavonoid glycosides, limonoids and alkaloids, which occur at high concentrations in the inner peel albedo, occurred at higher concentrations in PPJ.

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